Health and Beauty

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Spiritually Speaking | Send flowers

Written by By Sister Mary Thill. Posted in May

Cut flowers can increase compassion and kindness and decrease anxiety and worry, a Harvard study showed. People who lived with fresh-cut flowers for a week reported feeling less worried and less depressed while at home than people who lived with a decorative candle.—AARP Magazine, 
March/April 2007

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It’s time to remove the stigma from mental illness

Written by Healthy Living News. Posted in May

When someone is diagnosed with a serious medical ailment, such as heart disease, diabetes, or cancer, the typical reaction from family, friends, and acquaintances is sympathy and support. However, a diagnosis of mental illness oftentimes elicits a very different type of response, ranging from wariness and suspicion to outright fear and even discrimination. The perception seems to be that mental illness is a flaw rooted in an individual’s character or personality rather than a neurobiological disease. As a result of this stigma, people with mental illness too often feel ashamed, suffer in silence, and avoid seeking vital treatment.

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Sound Advice from Northwest Ohio Hearing Clinic |

Written by Randa Mansour-Shousher, AuD, CCC-A. Posted in May

Q: My father has been complaining of certain noises driving him up the wall, and he’s starting to appear depressed and scared. Can you please tell me a little bit about hyperacusis and what can be done about it?

A: I am so sorry to hear about the situation your dad is experiencing, and, yes, I can fill you in on hyperacusis. First you need to understand what hyperacusis is along with signs and what can be done. Hyperacusis is a condition in which an individual is intolerant to everyday sounds and, in turn, has developed an increased sensitivity to the same sounds in their normal environment. Individuals who suffer from hyperacusis complain of everyday sounds being way too loud. Because of this sensation, their daily life is affected, in particular their quality of life. They may start compensating by using some type of earplugs or earmuffs when they are outside of their environment where they cannot control the noise to ease their pain.

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Summer travel with allergies and asthma

Written by Healthy Living News. Posted in May

With another summer travel season upon us, many people across the country are getting ready to depart on long-anticipated, well-earned vacations—some to far-flung destinations, others closer to home. If you or someone in your family suffers with allergies and asthma, keep in mind that you may need to do some additional planning and preparation before departure.

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BE FAST to recognize the symptoms of stroke

Written by Healthy Living News. Posted in May

Stroke afflicts nearly 800,000 people each year and is a major cause of death and disability in our nation. While today’s advanced treatments are significantly improving stroke patient outcomes and mortality, time is always of the essence when it comes to this disease. The earlier treatment is initiated after symptom onset, the less damage to the victim’s brain and the more likely he or she will recover fully from the episode with few or no long-term functional deficits.

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Managing your allergy and asthma symptoms

Written by by Tere Koenig, MD. Posted in May

Many of us breathe a sigh of relief as the warm spring air starts to replace the arctic temperatures of an Ohio winter. But if you are one of the millions who suffer with allergies and/or asthma, you might not greet the change in the seasons with relief. Your eyes water, your nose itches, and you get a little short of breath just thinking about mowing the grass, gardening, and running around the yard with your kids. You may find yourself holding a tissue box with one hand and rubbing your eyes with the other.

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Energy that heals

Written by Douglas A. Schwan, DC, Dipl ac. Posted in May

Research has revealed that the simple act of implanting an electrical stimulator near the spinal cord is enough to give paralyzed patients the ability to move. Apparently, just providing the electrical energy is enough to allow the inborn intelligence of the body to use it for healing.

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TIA: a warning sign of potential stroke ahead

Written by Healthy Living News. Posted in May

Stroke-like symptoms that come on suddenly and resolve quickly should never be ignored or dismissed as an insignificant, passing event. This type of episode, though temporary, could actually be a mini-stroke, or transient ischemic attack (TIA)—a warning sign that a potentially deadly or debilitating larger stroke may be looming on the horizon.

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Noisy dental devices should concern patients, dentists, and assistants

Written by by Randa Mansour-Shousher, AuD, CCC-A. Posted in May

Hearing loss is a common complication in work environments, affecting family, friends, and strangers alike. Work-related hearing loss caused by noise may be preventable, but many don’t take it seriously until it’s too late and the loss—known as sensorineural hearing loss—is irreversible and permanent.

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